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پنجشنبه 28 آبان 1394

Sarah Hyland wears fire engine red parachute dress at Golden Globes Party

Her career really took off when she appeared in Modern Family.

And it seems actress Sarah Hyland is now taking inspiration from her stratospheric success for her fashion.

The star attended an InStyle Golden Globes party In West Hollywood on Tuesday, and the 24-year-old made quite the entrance in a fire engine red parachute dress.

Sarah currently stars as daughter Haley Dunphy on the hit ABC comedy show that's currently on it's seventh season.

The otherwise stunning beauty made a noticeably bold statement in her flared, red dress.

The two-piece frock was held together by wide, black straps, crossing in the back.

A bandeau top was strategically placed underneath the low-hanging neckline for added coverage.

Growing up in front of the cameras means that your sartorial choices are scrutinized well before you've found your footing in fashion. But Sarah Hyland proves she's made it out on top.

The Modern Family actor attended an InStyle Golden Globe party last night in a statement making red trapeze dress from Vera Wang's SS16 collection. With cut out details and thick black straps, the dress certainly turns heads! She completed her look with minimal fuss: stilettos with thin straps, a chic cat flick eye and hair tied back.

With party season creeping up, it's time to start planning ahead, and if you want to look festive, but still on trend, follow in Sarah's footsteps and be the lady in the red dress. Topshop, Boohoo, Suno and Nasty Gal will help you on your way (click below to shop now).

The beautiful brunette kept everything from her accessories to her make-up to a minimum.

She kept her hair tightly pulled back with a deep side part, showcasing her sparkling diamond earrings.

Her makeup was kept simple with a pale gloss and lightly flushed cheeks, except for her dramatic winged liner.

Sarah attended the soiree with boyfriend Dominic Sherwood, 25. The duo have been dating since February of this year.

Hyland was previously in a relationship with actor Matt Prokop, with whom, according to TMZ, she filed a restraining order against in September. In the court documents, Hyland says she 'feared for her life.'

Up next, the actress is lending her voice to the animated series,The Lion Guard. She''s joined by Rob Lowe and James Earl Jones. The series follows Simba's son Kion as he leads the lion guard to protect their land.

Read more:cheap bridesmaid dresses

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  • سه شنبه 26 آبان 1394

     

    Mieko Tahara Griffin, 1930-2015; ‘She Always Made a Point of Caring About Other People’

    More than four months after Mieko Tahara Griffin died at age 85, at the end of a decline of several years, the many people with whom she crossed paths during her 34 years in the Upper Valley still have memories of her generosity of spirit and substance.

    Whether teaching her deep-water aerobics in the Dartmouth pool or catching up with her at the Co-op Food Store, Carolyn Hooper Goetinck often marveled at the smooth skin that Griffin maintained deep into her 70s.

    “I once asked her how she kept looking so young,” Hooper Goetinck, a longtime personal trainer who also oversees the college’s Zimmerman Fitness Center, recalled recently. “She said, ‘I have this special scrubber towel from Japan.’ Next thing I knew, she brought me two of them — a yellow one and a blue one. I still have the yellow one.”

    Krisy Nordgren, who graduated from Hanover High School in 1990 with Griffin’s daughter, Alais, recalled dinners with the Griffins.

    “Mrs. Griffin once invited me over for Japanese food during high school, and I still remember her pride and approval when I tried valiantly to finish off her creations — dumplings, if I remember correctly,” Nordgren wrote in an email. “In her later life, I brought my son Soren — age 5 at the time — to visit her at her assisted-living home, and she always insisted on filling Soren’s pockets with Japanese candy, much to his delight.”

    Griffin, who grew up in Nimi, Japan, a rural area east of Hiroshima, started distributing the refreshments and the charm almost as soon as she moved to Hanover from tiny Jordans Village in England with her husband, Stuart Griffin, and their 10-year-old daughter in 1982.

    “She had a ton of friends back in England whom she was used to visiting any time,” Griffin’s daughter, Alais Griffin Elbrecht, now a lawyer living in Florida, recalled. “Right away here, she went to a neighbor’s house to say ‘hello.’ At one point somebody said to her, ‘Mieko, you know you can’t just pop in on people. You’ve got to call first.’

    Mieko Griffin at her daughter Alais Griffin's wedding in Waitsfield, Vt., in 2012. (Corey Hendrickson photograph)

    “People were not quite as friendly at first.”

    She won most of them over, one by one, while Alais worked her way through Richmond Middle School and Hanover High.

    “My dad always delighted in speaking with Mieko while either picking me up from soccer practice or from sleepovers at Alais’ house,” said Lori Rosenstein, who grew up in Norwich after being adopted from Korea as an infant. “When I was at Alais’ house, I would always smell the elaborate meals Mieko would prepare. The first time I ever saw a rice cooker was when I was at Alais’. Mieko would share her knowledge of Korean culture and politics with me.

    “While waiting for dinner — that was often prepared later than most families I knew — Mieko would serve me white rice and soy sauce, which I always looked forward to. Sometimes it would surprise me ... when she added hot dogs to the combination of ingredients. Of course she would warn me not to eat too much or else I would get fat.”

    There was never much danger of Mieko Griffin gaining too much weight, especially while Alais was growing long and lean and winning New Hampshire championships in cross-country running and in track and field, and leading Hanover to team titles.

    “I think of my mother dashing around the course while my dad sat in the car reading the paper,” Elbrecht said. “She’d rush around cheering everybody on.”

    And winning over cross-country coach Jim Eakin.

    “I had to explain to Mieko the difference between cross-country and track,” Eakin said recently. “She caught on to the different seasons and probably never missed a meet. Mieko was just astonished that Alais could run that far and that fast and asked me how she did it. I told her that Alais inherited her genes. Mieko nodded in agreement and said, ‘I think so.’ She ... would also ask me to speak to Alais about eating well and getting enough sleep.”

    She also let on, gradually, about growing up in Japan in the 1930s, losing her own mother at age 6, and enduring World War II — during which her brother died — and the deprivations that followed.

    “It must have been an incredible hardship for a young girl,” Eakin said. “She not only survived, but prevailed. I do not know whether Alais inherited Mieko’s running genes, but Alais certainly inherited Mieko’s indomitable spirit and courage.”

    Griffin needed both qualities during the last decade or so of life for Stuart Griffin, the freelance writer whom she had met while Stuart, then living in Japan, was covering a sports event. The poor eyesight and bad feet that had dogged Stuart Griffin in his youth and young adulthood slowed him even more in the years before he died in 2004, though he and Mieko continued to go to Dartmouth baseball games and other Big Green sporting events, and to host dinners for Dartmouth athletes. They also attended concerts at the college — particularly those of the Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble — and stayed active in the Dartmouth Film Society.

    On her breaks from helping Stuart in and out of the car and into the baseball bleachers, or wheeling his chair into movie theaters and concert halls, Mieko Griffin found solace and fellowship in activities of her own, among them the World Peace Prayer Society. As a member, she participated in at least one ceremony in the early 2000s in downtown Hanover, commemorating the anniversaries of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    And not long before losing Stuart, she completed the naturalization process and gained U.S. citizenship.

    “It was partly because she was worried about when my father died, but I think she was very proud of it,” Elbrecht said. “She showed me her certificate.”

    Griffin also took pride, and joy, in regularly attending exercise classes in Dartmouth’s Fitness Lifestyle and Improvement (FLIP) program, particularly Hooper Goetinck’s session combining strength training with deep-water aerobics.

    “She loved the FLIP classes,” her daughter recalled, “even though a lot of the time she went to exercise and then sat on the machines and chatted with people.”

    There was so much to chat about, especially with a circle of women of her own generation. The gathering included longtime Five College Book Sale stalwart Mimi MacNamee and several other widows who often got together outside of class. Their maternal instincts kicked in when Hooper Goetinck, then a student in the class, returned after a difficult pregnancy with her son Dylan, now 20.

    “They kind of took me under their wing,” Hooper Goetinck said. “I had barely gotten off bedrest, and they were nothing but supportive.”

    None more so than Griffin.

    “In the face of everything I understood that she was dealing with, she kept her positive take on things, and always made a point of caring about other people,” Hooper Goetinck said. “When I would run into her at the store or something, she’d always ask how things were. She was somebody you could count on.

    “She just sort of embraced you.”

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  • سه شنبه 26 آبان 1394

    Mieko Tahara Griffin, 1930-2015; ‘She Always Made a Point of Caring About Other People’

    More than four months after Mieko Tahara Griffin died at age 85, at the end of a decline of several years, the many people with whom she crossed paths during her 34 years in the Upper Valley still have memories of her generosity of spirit and substance.

    Whether teaching her deep-water aerobics in the Dartmouth pool or catching up with her at the Co-op Food Store, Carolyn Hooper Goetinck often marveled at the smooth skin that Griffin maintained deep into her 70s.

    “I once asked her how she kept looking so young,” Hooper Goetinck, a longtime personal trainer who also oversees the college’s Zimmerman Fitness Center, recalled recently. “She said, ‘I have this special scrubber towel from Japan.’ Next thing I knew, she brought me two of them — a yellow one and a blue one. I still have the yellow one.”

    Krisy Nordgren, who graduated from Hanover High School in 1990 with Griffin’s daughter, Alais, recalled dinners with the Griffins.

    “Mrs. Griffin once invited me over for Japanese food during high school, and I still remember her pride and approval when I tried valiantly to finish off her creations — dumplings, if I remember correctly,” Nordgren wrote in an email. “In her later life, I brought my son Soren — age 5 at the time — to visit her at her assisted-living home, and she always insisted on filling Soren’s pockets with Japanese candy, much to his delight.”

    Griffin, who grew up in Nimi, Japan, a rural area east of Hiroshima, started distributing the refreshments and the charm almost as soon as she moved to Hanover from tiny Jordans Village in England with her husband, Stuart Griffin, and their 10-year-old daughter in 1982.

    “She had a ton of friends back in England whom she was used to visiting any time,” Griffin’s daughter, Alais Griffin Elbrecht, now a lawyer living in Florida, recalled. “Right away here, she went to a neighbor’s house to say ‘hello.’ At one point somebody said to her, ‘Mieko, you know you can’t just pop in on people. You’ve got to call first.’

    Mieko Griffin at her daughter Alais Griffin's wedding in Waitsfield, Vt., in 2012. (Corey Hendrickson photograph)

    “People were not quite as friendly at first.”

    She won most of them over, one by one, while Alais worked her way through Richmond Middle School and Hanover High.

    “My dad always delighted in speaking with Mieko while either picking me up from soccer practice or from sleepovers at Alais’ house,” said Lori Rosenstein, who grew up in Norwich after being adopted from Korea as an infant. “When I was at Alais’ house, I would always smell the elaborate meals Mieko would prepare. The first time I ever saw a rice cooker was when I was at Alais’. Mieko would share her knowledge of Korean culture and politics with me.

    “While waiting for dinner — that was often prepared later than most families I knew — Mieko would serve me white rice and soy sauce, which I always looked forward to. Sometimes it would surprise me ... when she added hot dogs to the combination of ingredients. Of course she would warn me not to eat too much or else I would get fat.”

    There was never much danger of Mieko Griffin gaining too much weight, especially while Alais was growing long and lean and winning New Hampshire championships in cross-country running and in track and field, and leading Hanover to team titles.

    “I think of my mother dashing around the course while my dad sat in the car reading the paper,” Elbrecht said. “She’d rush around cheering everybody on.”

    And winning over cross-country coach Jim Eakin.

    “I had to explain to Mieko the difference between cross-country and track,” Eakin said recently. “She caught on to the different seasons and probably never missed a meet. Mieko was just astonished that Alais could run that far and that fast and asked me how she did it. I told her that Alais inherited her genes. Mieko nodded in agreement and said, ‘I think so.’ She ... would also ask me to speak to Alais about eating well and getting enough sleep.”

    She also let on, gradually, about growing up in Japan in the 1930s, losing her own mother at age 6, and enduring World War II — during which her brother died — and the deprivations that followed.

    “It must have been an incredible hardship for a young girl,” Eakin said. “She not only survived, but prevailed. I do not know whether Alais inherited Mieko’s running genes, but Alais certainly inherited Mieko’s indomitable spirit and courage.”

    Griffin needed both qualities during the last decade or so of life for Stuart Griffin, the freelance writer whom she had met while Stuart, then living in Japan, was covering a sports event. The poor eyesight and bad feet that had dogged Stuart Griffin in his youth and young adulthood slowed him even more in the years before he died in 2004, though he and Mieko continued to go to Dartmouth baseball games and other Big Green sporting events, and to host dinners for Dartmouth athletes. They also attended concerts at the college — particularly those of the Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble — and stayed active in the Dartmouth Film Society.

    On her breaks from helping Stuart in and out of the car and into the baseball bleachers, or wheeling his chair into movie theaters and concert halls, Mieko Griffin found solace and fellowship in activities of her own, among them the World Peace Prayer Society. As a member, she participated in at least one ceremony in the early 2000s in downtown Hanover, commemorating the anniversaries of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    And not long before losing Stuart, she completed the naturalization process and gained U.S. citizenship.

    “It was partly because she was worried about when my father died, but I think she was very proud of it,” Elbrecht said. “She showed me her certificate.”

    Griffin also took pride, and joy, in regularly attending exercise classes in Dartmouth’s Fitness Lifestyle and Improvement (FLIP) program, particularly Hooper Goetinck’s session combining strength training with deep-water aerobics.

    “She loved the FLIP classes,” her daughter recalled, “even though a lot of the time she went to exercise and then sat on the machines and chatted with people.”

    There was so much to chat about, especially with a circle of women of her own generation. The gathering included longtime Five College Book Sale stalwart Mimi MacNamee and several other widows who often got together outside of class. Their maternal instincts kicked in when Hooper Goetinck, then a student in the class, returned after a difficult pregnancy with her son Dylan, now 20.

    “They kind of took me under their wing,” Hooper Goetinck said. “I had barely gotten off bedrest, and they were nothing but supportive.”

    None more so than Griffin.

    “In the face of everything I understood that she was dealing with, she kept her positive take on things, and always made a point of caring about other people,” Hooper Goetinck said. “When I would run into her at the store or something, she’d always ask how things were. She was somebody you could count on.

    “She just sort of embraced you.”

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  • شنبه 23 آبان 1394

    Cool ways to dress up in your man’s shirts

    Fashion.ie, Irish fashion news. Everyone loves the idea of a woman wearing her boyfriend’s shirt, but the boxy, shape-obliterating reality is often a far cry from the sexy ideal laid out in movies and magazines. Well, not anymore! Charles Manning of Cosmopolitan.co.uk reports. These four dresses are figure-flattering, sophisticated, and fun — no cutting or sewing required. Seriously, if you can tie a knot and button a button, you can make these dresses.

    THE 2-SHIRT KNOT DRESS

    Wrap the second shirt around your waist and button it up to create the skirt.

    Tie the sleeves over the untucked front of the main shirt and smooth out any lumps or bulges.

    Roll up your sleeves and leave the top few buttons of your main shirt undone for a more flattering shape, especially if the shirt is particularly loose

    gallery-1444419816-boyfriendshirt3

    THE 2 SHIRT PENCIL SKIRT

    Wrap the second shirt around your waist and button it up to create the skirt, tucking your main shirt in front and back.

    Bring the sleeves of the second shirt around to the front and tie them firmly around your hips.

    Roll down the collar of the second shirt to create a sleeker, more defined waistband.

    For a more feminine touch, tie the sleeves of the second shirt into a bow instead of just a basic knot.

    THE 3-SHIRT V-NECK DRESS

    Button two shirts together to create one giant, four-armed shirt.

    Stick your head through the newly elongated neck hole and put your arms through the two sleeves in the back of the garment, so the two remaining sleeves are hanging in front of you.

    Turn each of the unworn sleeves inside out and tie them together behind your back at your natural waist — tight enough that the front of the giant shirt lies flat against your body, but not so tight that it pulls unflatteringly at the buttons.

    Smooth out the excess fabric in front, so there is a long fold running down both sides of the front of the garment and the whole thing is lying as flat and as close to your body as possible.

    Wrap the third shirt around your waist and tie the sleeves in front.

    THE 3-SHIRT SIDE-SPLIT DRESS

    Button two shirts together around your waist by their collars and turn them so you have one shirt in back and one shirt in front.

    Tie the arms of the front shirt behind your back, at your waist, underneath the back shirt so the knotted sleeves are hidden from view. Make sure to carefully smooth out the front of what is now your skirt as you do this to avoid any unflattering lumps.

    Take the sleeves of the shirt making up the back of your skirt, and tie them low but firmly across your hips. [Note: If the shirts are different weights, use the shirt with the lighter fabric for the front of the skirt. That way, the knot you create in the back will be smaller and much harder to see through the thicker, heavier fabric of the shirt making up the back of the skirt.

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  • پنجشنبه 21 آبان 1394

    Strut your stuff for a good cause at Queensferry charity fashion show

    A mum from Queensferry is hosting a fashion show to raise funds for refugees crossing Europe after being affected by distressing images in the media this summer.

    Lindsay Robertson planned the event and hopes to raise as much money as possible for the Scottish Refugee Council, and have fun at the same time. Professional events company Colours will host the fashion show and will sell High Street clothes on the night for a 30-50 per cent discount.

    She said: “Like many people, I have been deeply affected by some of the images of refugees we saw in the media over the summer. I got together with some other local mums and put together a package of supplies to send over to help people in the camps across Europe.

    Charity fashion show will take place this weekend

    “I talked through a few fundraising ideas with some friends before settling on the idea of the fashion show.

    “I thought it would be a good, fun event to hold locally which would benefit the people attending it as well as helping to raise money for the charity.

    “Win win all round!”

    The fashion show is being held at South Queensferry Scout Hall in Port Edgar at 7pm on Saturday, November 14.

    Tickets cost £7 and a glass of bubbly is included.

    Lindsay said: “We’re also going to have some things available to buy that people who arrived in Scotland as refugees and were supported by the SRC have made.

    “And we’re going to have a raffle that many local businesses have been really generous in providing prizes for.

    “Throw in the fact that it’s BYOB and everyone will be offered a glass of bubbles on arrival, then I think it’s got the makings of a great fun night!”

    Read more:silver bridesmaid dresses

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  • سه شنبه 19 آبان 1394

    Millie Mackintosh puts on a very leggy display in tiny blue velvet dress

    She works hard in the gym every week.

    And Millie Mackintosh loves to show off the results on a glam night out.

    The former Made In Chelsea star put her long legs in the spotlight on Monday evening as she stepped out in a tiny blue velvet mini dress for the British Takeaway Awards, held at London's Savoy Hotel.

    Millie, 26, chose a dress from her own clothing collection for the star-studded night out, with the midnight blue number fitting her svelte figure perfectly.

    The star's long, slender legs were on display thanks to the short hemline, while her super high platform heels from Aquazzura accentuated her pins further.

    Besties: Millie's best friend and TV chef Gizzi Erskine joined the party looking  chic in a little black dress with a high embellished neckline

    The top half of Millie's dress showed some skin with a sheer lace panel, while the star added to the glam factor by styling her luscious locks into loose waves.

    These days, there are awards for pretty much everything. Best soap dramas, best musicians, best films...and now even best takeaways - who knew!?

    The celebrities certainly weren't missing out on the chance to acknowledge our favourite takeaway locations either, even Millie Mackintosh was having a cheat day in the awards' honour. The stunning wife of Professor Green posed outside the event in this cute blue mini dress. We happen to have a little thing for velvet here at Fashion Finder so this dress really caught our eye. Throw some lace into the mix too and we really have got a winner.

    The best thing about Millie's dress from her own line is that nothing says Christmas attire like velvet, so it's perfect for the festive season. If you're on the lookout for a fabulous party dress then search no further than this pretty little number (right).

    There are quite a few alternatives up for grabs mind, so before you snap up Millie's pick, check out our alternative options below to ensure you're bagging your favourite piece of velvet this winter.

    A flawless face of makeup finished the look off as the stunning star posed up a storm at the awards, in association with takeaway service Just Eat and held to honour the best take-out restaurants across the UK.

    Millie told her Instagram followers she was breaking her dedicated gym and diet routine for the special occasion, declaring:

    'What would a cheat day be without a take away? Happy to be supporting #theBTAs with @justeatuk this evening wearing @milliemackintoshclothing @aquazzura'.

    Millie posed happily with her former Chelsea co-star Rosie Fortescue, who looked super-chic in a pair of slim-fitting black trousers and a lace off-the-shoulder top.

    They were joined by Millie's best friend and TV chef Gizzi Erskine, who went for a simply chic little black dress with a high embellished neckline.

    The girls tucked into a no-doubt delicious meal at the awards alongside the likes of Thom Evans and Tess Daly and Vernon Kay.

    Read more:champagne bridesmaid dresses uk

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  • جمعه 15 آبان 1394

    18 Alexa Chung Style Moments That Prove How Versatile Her Look Is

    Oh, Alexa: Would that we could all live in your closet. Can you imagine how amazing it must be in Alexa Chung's wardrobe? Chanel party dresses, side by side with her trademark tomboy-esque wares, all surrounded with a generous contingency of Charlotte Olympia's quirky kitty flats... There's certainly a reason why model/designer/CEO Chung has made her way into our collective hearts as a bona fide fashion darling over the years — and really, would we expect anything less from the entrepreneur who created an app inspired by Cher's high-tech closet from Clueless?

    Honestly, there are few people in the world with better fashion game than Chung — after all, the lady's got serious range; she can wear everything from supremely elegant, delicately-embroidered Valentino to irreverentlyoversized pullovers paired with silver statement skirts. Heck, she's also been known to work wonders with denim, and she's got quite the fabulous track record when it comes to fashion week street style.

    With all that in mind, why not celebrate Chung's inherent awesomeness with a little list? She's worn so many amazing outfits over the years — so let's peruse some of her best ensembles!

    1. In Balmain x H&M at the Collection Launch Party

    Classic with a twist.

    2. In Valentino at an Event for Bvlgari

    Pure, unadulterated fairy princess madness.

    3. In Alessandra Riche at a Celebration for Piaget

    The elegant white Alessandra Riche dress is already pretty fab on its own — but the Charlotte Olympia kitty flats definitely kick things up a level.

    4. ln Erdem at the 2015 Met Gala

    Only Chung could successfully pair powder blue pumps with a fuchsia brocade gown.

    5. In Emilia Wickstead at the 2014 British Fashion Awards

    Coolest clutch ever, or coolest clutch ever?

    6. In Vilshenko at the Launch of Her Nails, Inc Collection

    Everything about this look is pure gold.

    7. In Chanel at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Preview Party

    RUFFLES. And patent leather.

    8. In Valentino at Milan Fashion Week

    It doesn't get much better than a butterfly-covered cape, does it?

    9. In Miu Miu at a Screening of Spark & Light

    Um, adorable.

    10. In Stella McCartney at the 2013 British Fashion Awards

    No one can quite pull of an LWD quite like Chung can.

    11. In Bella Freud at the L’Oreal Colour Trophy Awards 2013

    Excellent use of sparkles.

    12. In Chanel at the Chanel Tribeca Film Festival Artists Dinner

    Chanel tweed has rarely looked so irreverently youthful as it does right here.

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  • چهارشنبه 13 آبان 1394

    Edo Church Abort Wedding Over Groom’s Refusal To Remove 50k Designer Shoes

    What was planned as a day of joyful union between a couple (names withheld) weekend turned awry as the spiritual leader of a fast growing miracle church in Benin City, Edo State capital declined to wed a couple following the refusal of the groom to pull his Italian designer shoes before entry into the church.

    Worshippers, friends, family members and well-wishers who stormed the church were disappointed as the groom, who claimed he bought his shoes for N50,000, was adamant as he shunned pleas from his bride to comply with the rules of the church.

    According to a source in the know, the church is reputed for miracles which have led to the influx of new converts from residents in the vicinity. It was learnt that the groom’s father who was expected to prevail on the groom shunned all effort to ensure that the wedding took place.

    3

    Meanwhile, as the drama raged, guests and well-wishers who were seated under the canopies for reception at the same venue were lavishly entertained by hired caterers as the confusion between the church’s overseer and the couple continued.

    The beautiful bride who refused to be consoled over the incident wept profusely before church members, and the groom soon followed as tears freely ran down his cheeks.

    A senior pastor in the church who does not want his name in print said: “It is quite unfortunate that the groom is adamant.

    “We expected that the bride who is our member must have educated him enough.

    It is not new among our members.

    Politicians, business moguls who often visit comply with our ways of worship and I must say that what we do here is divine and biblical.”

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  • دوشنبه 11 آبان 1394

    Is this the end of marriage?

    Heterosexual couples are fighting for the right to a civil partnership, eschewing the age-old traditions of matrimony, says Alex Clark

    When Nadiya Hussain introduced her final, competition-winning showstopper to the Great British Bake Off judges – a tiered lemon drizzle wedding cake decorated with her own nuptial jewellery and material from a red, white and blue sari – she explained that because she and her husband of a decade, Abdal, had married in Bangladesh, they hadn’t had a wedding cake themselves; in Bangladesh, it’s not the tradition.

    But although there was clearly an emotional freight to her choice of cake, she talked quite calmly and matter-of-factly; and certainly not with the intensity or sense of traumatic deprivation suggested by subsequent reports. Nadiya’s victory, went the dominant narrative, was in some way propelled, and definitely deepened, by the fact that she conjured into culinary being “the cake she never had”; as if both her marriage – and, by cake-based cultural association, her Britishness – were all well and good, but missing that final piece of fondant-iced validation.

    This peculiar attachment to the ceremonial trappings of an institution profoundly altered by decades of gradual social change and, more recently, by iconoclastic legislation, is what has powered nine domestic series and a healthy export life for the BBC television programme Don’t Tell the Bride. In it, a hapless groom is packed off with some corporation cash and given three weeks to organise the wedding of a lifetime for his wife-to-be (the show’s focus has hitherto been almost exclusively heterosexual).

    The key concept here is that the wedding is the bride’s “day”; with men pressured into delivering it, mothers enraged that their daughters haven’t got it, women standing, a broken heel in their hands, wailing that it’s all been ruined. Prior to that, though, comes the show’s staple scene: the chief bridesmaid hissing the words “she’s not happy” into a mobile phone as the bride stands in a fitting room failing to be laced into a ruched nightmare that is the exact opposite of the “dress of her dreams”. The next scene usually portrays the disconsolate groom staring into a pint in a pub garden, while his best man, mind wandering towards the fired-up bridesmaid, half-heartedly comforts him…

    A scene from TV programme Don't Tell the Bride

    Women dressed up as cakes, cakes dressed up as women: do we still live in the 1950s? Well, no: marriage cannot resist modernity, despite modernity still sometimes seeming in thrall to it. Even the first series of the romantic TV comedyCatastrophe ended in a wedding. At London’s Southbank Centre, the site of the 1951 Festival of Britain, Herbert Morrison’s “tonic for the nation”, they are already taking early-bird bookings for next year’s Big Wedding Weekend (Package 1, £1,950, including choirs, fanfares and two bouquets). Channel 4’s controversialMarried at First Sight, in which a panel of experts – including a Church of England vicar – paired up men and women, who met each other only on the day of their wedding, is most memorable for the speedy, if unsurprising, collapse of one partnership, whose male half was spotted on Tinder when he should have been at a counselling session. You don’t get much more of a mashed-up old-new parable than that.

    Weddings are not the same as marriages – and the conflation of the two is part of the issue. Many will continue to do both – for a jolly good party, to satisfy parents or family, for attachment to the past, for sheer romance. But increasingly, people are wondering whether they could do without either. Despite a small and very recent upward tick, the trend is unmistakably downward, and has been for several decades; Office for National Statistics figures tell us that whereas in 1971, 404,000 marriages took place, by 2009 that figure was down to 232,000. So you have to wonder, what is the point of getting married?

    There are practical considerations. Since the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013, gay people can marry, although they still don’t have true parity with heterosexual couples as the governing bodies of religious organisations, such as the Church of England, would have to explicitly “opt in”; in the case of the C of E, synodical legislation subject to parliamentary approval would also be required.

    Same-sex couples have also retained the right to form civil partnerships, according to the ground-breaking legislation introduced in 2004. But – in an anomaly apparently borne of past political expediency – opposite-sex couples may not. Men and women who do not wish to marry are left with no way to formalise their relationships in the eyes of the state and of the law. And this is not merely academic: simple cohabitation affords little or no legal protection, particularly when one partner dies. You do not have to be a tax dodger to fear the weight of a vast inheritance tax that might force you to sell your family home – but from which your married equivalent would be exempt.

    If it no longer fits our outlook on life, marriage is unlikely to survive

    I meet Rebecca Steinfeld and Charles Keidan, one of this country’s three million cohabiting opposite-sex couples, as they sit with their extraordinarily amenable daughter, five-month-old Eden, in a quiet back office in Westminster. We’ve just been watching, alongside other supporters of the Campaign for Equal Civil Partnerships, as Conservative MP Tim Loughton took his bill asking for an amendment to existing legislation through the Commons with no opposition. Our parliamentary system being what it is, that is but a step along the way to the law being changed; equally if not more important will be the outcome of the judicial review triggered by Charles and Rebecca’s legal challenge.

    The couple met in 2010 at a lecture on Gaza at the LSE, and a few years later decided they wanted to commit themselves to one another during a holiday in the Pyrenees.

    So, why didn’t they want to get married then, and why don’t they now?

    “I’d phrase it slightly differently,” replies Rebecca, a political scientist. “I’d say we actively want to enter into a civil partnership because it is a modern social institution that from our point of view is relatively neutral and a blank slate and doesn’t have the historical baggage or contemporary associations or pressure to participate in certain rituals and activities that marriage has.”

    Rebecca explains that much of the baggage persists: there is still no space on the marriage register or certificate for the mothers of participants to enter their names or occupations; while it is straightforward for a woman to take her husband’s name, a man has to change his by deed poll even if he’s only double-barrelling (Eden’s surname, they tell me, is a fusion of the first syllables of theirs, thus Keidstein; her first name is deliberately gender-neutral and her second, Layla, has roots in both Arabic and Hebrew to reflect their commitment to Middle Eastern issues).

    The couple presented themselves at Chelsea Old Town Hall a year ago, and informed officials of their intention to enter into a civil partnership; after it was established that they were an opposite-sex couple, they were told they could not, and so asked the registrar to consider an act of civil disobedience and register them anyway. No dice; and hence a campaign that has snowballed, gathering support from across political parties.

    Loughton himself voted against equal marriage in 2013, but believes that making sure that civil partnerships are open to all will have a positive effect on family stability, telling me that “modern life has moved on and we have to recognise that families and unions take many different forms now”; Green MP Caroline Lucas, who explains that for her, it is “about upholding an important principle in a democratic society, that we are all equal before the law”; and Labour’s Andy Slaughter, who is both Charles and Rebecca’s MP and the Shadow Minister for Justice.

    Life has moved on and we have to recognise that families and unions take many different forms now

    Precise grounds for resistance to change are unclear, with explanations including the government’s feeling that there is not enough consensus around the issue, and the more speculative notion that they prefer not to stir up the divisions caused by the equal marriage debate.

    Also vocal in her support is journalist and campaigner Fiona Millar, who has been not married to Alastair Campbell for 35 years; the couple have three children. It was, she says, simply an institution that didn’t feel right for her. We talk about the practical impact that the lack of rights afforded to cohabiting couples has; does she, I ask, think it hits women harder?

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    “Not necessarily, but probably,” she replies, “because of the mummy trap. We know that women tend to give up careers and jobs once they have children, and women with children take lower paid work, often part-time work, so by the time they get to their 40s, 50s and 60s, they’re very often in a situation where they aren’t as economically powerful as their partners and husbands. So the chances are that this would disproportionately impact on women.”

    Has she herself ever experienced any negative emotional dimension to not marrying?

    “Not really, no, she says. “I’ve felt the relationship was perfectly strong enough, and we’ve been equal partners in every other sense.”

    Jimmy Pierce and Laura Cochrane, who are expecting their first child, echo those sentiments. “We are partners, equal partners,” Laura tells me. “A civil partnership reflects this in a way that marriage simply doesn’t.”

    Martin Loat, who has been with his female partner for 23 years, and with whom he has two children, explains that they simply felt marriage was too conventional, and carried with it a weight that they didn’t feel was necessary to solidify their relationship. He is also a fount of unexpected information, telling me that you don’t need to consummate a civil partnership for it to be valid, and nor is adultery grounds for its dissolution, and rightly so: “For a state institution to comment on my or my partner’s sex life and what effect that will have on our relationship is not something I’m particularly interested in or want to support.”

    Caroline Lucas celebrates with her husband Richard Savage

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    United front: Caroline Lucas with her partner Richard Savage. Photograph: Chris Ison/PA

    An obvious question is raised by all of this. Given that marriage is available to all (despite some continuing problems, most notably the contentious “spousal veto” that affects the transgender community, and which has recently been discussed in Westminster as part of the Women and Equalities Committee’s inquiry into transgender equality), and given that there is no compulsory religious element, why not just do away with civil partnerships? Sure, the historical and cultural associations remain, but won’t they merely dissolve over time, and marriage mutate into its new, inclusive form?

    Robert Wintemute, Professor of Human Rights Law at King’s College, London, points out that, in the UK, “Stonewall will oppose the abolition of civil partnerships, which means that they must be extended. An alternative to marriage for both different-sex and same-sex couples [that is not easy to terminate like the Pacs in France] exists in the Netherlands, Gibraltar, Malta, Quebec, South Africa, New Zealand and the US states of Hawaii and Illinois. And there is no evidence that it has threatened marriage in any of these places.”

    But even if it did, the question of what would be threatened is unclear. People loving each other? Unlikely. Wanting to stand beside one another as they make homes, bring up children, train to be doctors, scientists, IT analysts, florists, police officers? Probably not. If marriage is waning because it seems no longer to fit with our outlook on life, it’s unlikely to survive over the long haul – even if it makes the lives of people who won’t play the game needlessly precarious by denying them the rights granted to those living precisely the same kinds of lives. In Charles Keidan’s words, “I don’t see how it strengthens marriage to push people into marrying reluctantly in order to obtain those protections.”

    Watch this space next January when Steinfeld and Keidan’s judicial review will take place, as a result of which they hope UK law will be declared incompatible with European human rights legislation, and when Tim Loughton’s bill will have its second reading. Neither will necessarily herald immediate change, but it is surely coming. And, as millions of people daily demonstrate that commitment does not come in the form of a slip of official paper, who would want to be a confetti-covered King Canute?

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  • جمعه 8 آبان 1394

    Last Minute Makeup Ideas For Halloween

    The final countdown for Halloween is here, and if you’ve yet to find your costume you’re probably in a panic. That’s where these makeup-centered looks come into play. Whether you’re an expert or just want a quick and easy solution, there’s a last minute Halloween makeup look for you!

    Halloween may be all about dressing up and having fun, but if you forgot to plan your costume ahead, it can also be stressful. Luckily, celebrities like Victoria Justice and Gigi Hadid (plus some YouTube experts) have done the hard work for all of us and found the perfect looks that just require a bit of makeup. See how you can use makeup to create a fun look, below, no matter what you makeup level of expertise.

    Last Minute Halloween Makeup

    Easy: For a look that doesn’t require a ton of makeup skills but will get you compliments for the chic factor, copy the Jeremy Scott runway look sported by Gigi. Once you copy the Wella Professionals hair guide, replicate the makeup by applying your foundation and a finishing powder. Use MAC Blacktrack Fluidline Gel Liner andOn The Hunt Superslick Liquid Eye Liner to create a classic cat eye on the upper lid and fishtail liner on the lower lashline. For the coral lips, MAC Pro LipMix in Orange, White and Medium Nude were mixed for a custom shade, but you could also use MAC Lipstick in Flamingo for a subtler take on the coral color without all of the mixing.

    Medium: If you want a look that’s a little out of the box, but not super difficult to achieve, why not go as everyone’s favorite Snapchat filter, the puking rainbow? Getting Pretty‘s Brittany shares the whole how-to, which really only requires you to add the Mehron Makeup Palette to your makeup kit.

    Last Minute Halloween Makeup — Beginner Or Pro, Find Your Match

    Pro: Superior makeup skills and the patience to match (or a really nice friend who’s a makeup genius) may be required for this cartoon look Victoria tried out on Instagram, but it’s definitely going to be a hit. Makeup artist Lusine Galadjian created the look for Victoria, and for anyone bold enough to give it a try, there are tons of YouTube tutorials dedicated to the comic book look (speech bubble not included).

    Join Amazon Prime – Watch Thousands of Movies & TV Shows Anytime – Start Free Trial Now

    Are you still looking for a costume? Would you give any of these makeup looks a try?

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  • چهارشنبه 6 آبان 1394

    From the mouths of brides: Wisdom-tested wedding tips and inspirations

    The LookBook and Inquirer Lifestyle launched last Thursday “I Do! An Insider’s Guide for Brides,” a slim but useful volume designed to help engaged couples lessen, if not totally eliminate stress, while planning their dream wedding.

    Written by Carmencita Sioson, Stefanie Cabal Rostoll and Ronna Capili Bonifacio, the 171-page book is full of beautiful images and useful, practical tips from real brides and top wedding-industry practitioners such as wedding planner Rita Neri.

    The book’s launch at the Peninsula Manila’s upper lobby coincided with the formal launching of Bulgari’s line of engagement rings and wedding bands. (See related story).

    As the book’s major sponsor, Bulgari set up a display area featuring its growing collection of engagement rings, wedding bands and various timepieces and jewelry as gift items. It has become a popular practice these days among Filipino couples to give each other gifts on their wedding day.

    A chapter in the book is devoted to models wearing iconic jewelry pieces from Bulgari and wedding gowns by designers Randy Ortiz, Lulu Tan Gan, Rhett Eala, J.C. Buendia and Ivarluski Aseron.

    Organizers also staged a one-night exhibit of bridal gowns worn by real brides featured in the book—Kelly Misa Fernandez, Isabel Roces Trebol, Kristel Yulo Diaz, Bianca Gonzalez Intal, Cybill Gayatin Guynn, Pam Huang Hernandez, Bea Soriano Dee and Beatrice Tantoco Reyes.

    “Before this book came out, I don’t think we even had a comprehensive, locally produced wedding guide,” said Bonifacio.

    Real brides

    What makes it different from articles and tips in wedding magazines is the selection of real brides and their unique stories and personal experiences.

    “Since it’s a handy, reader-friendly guide consisting of 12 chapters, including a directory, couples don’t have to buy different bridal magazines to get plenty of useful and current information,” said Sioson.

    If certain inspirations and ideas provided by real brides aren’t exactly applicable to some couples because of budget and time constraints, every pair, especially the woman, is sure to benefit from their “top tips.”

    “Relax,” Diaz, who married Marco Diaz in Tuscany, says in the book. “Being happy with your groom is more important than the minute details of your wedding, which you should delegate to your planners and suppliers. Things will all work out if you let them.”

    Fernandez, who married Carlos Antonio Fernandez at the St. Pancratius Chapel (aka Paco Park), reminded couples to be “smart” with their money.

    Realistic budget

    “Decide on a realistic budget,” she says. “Don’t blow all your money on your wedding. Remember, you also have to think of your life together after the wedding. You want to start comfortably and not worry about money. Set the date and the rest will follow.”

    Guynn, daughter of designer Arcy Gayatin, has a short and sweet reminder to couples based on her own experience while she and then fiancé Kevin Guynn were planning their Cebu wedding: “Regardless of what’s trendy and trending, your wedding should reflect who you are.”

    Apart from chapters featuring destination weddings, wedding baubles, including Elizabeth Taylor’s legendary love affair with Bulgari, and his-and-hers gift ideas, the book also devotes chapters meant for the bride like pampering and hair and skincare to help her look her best on the big day.

    Leading makeup artists such as Bobby Carlos, Mayesa delos Santos and Paolo Maranan likewise share tips and tricks of the trade on how to achieve various looks—from sun-kissed glow to effortlessly radiant, classic and romantic—with the right makeup and styling.

    Minimizing stress

    Two of the best ways to minimize stress and make planning a shared, enjoyable experience for the couple are to plan ahead and prioritize, according to the book. Unfortunately, it’s easier said than done.

    So there’s a bridal calendar, which doubles as a checklist of various things and concerns the couple should attend to as they start preparing a year ahead.

    “We’ve also put together stories of what makes a wedding successful from insiders and industry veterans themselves like Rita Neri and events stylists Robert Blancaflor and Moss Manila,” said Rostoll.

    Sioson and Rostoll also wrote “Help! I’m a Shoe Addict!,” The LOOKBook and Inquirer Lifestyle’s first hardbound title launched earlier this year.

    Having been brides themselves, Bonifacio and Rostoll drew from their experiences and the real and immediate concerns they had to deal with while planning their weddings.

    While she has yet to march down the aisle, Sioson has had ample first-hand experience in planning weddings, as she helped plan elder brother Patrick Sioson’s recent wedding to Jebeth Lejarde.

    The authors’ collective experiences are reflected in the book in terms of the importance, length and priority they put on each topic. They also shared personal advice on how to make a difficult and time-consuming process like planning almost effortless and joyful.

    “Focus on what you get at the end of the day,” said Bonifacio, who experienced rain, of all days, on her wedding day in Tagaytay. “When you wake up, you’re single. When you go to sleep later that day, you already have a husband. No matter what happens on the wedding day, it’s the union that’s supposed to last forever. That’s what is important.”

    On a more practical note, she reminded couples to set a realistic budget and stick to it. All your grand plans would amount to nothing if you don’t have the right budget. And don’t forget to share the “fun.”

    “We both wanted our families to have fun on our wedding day,” said Rostoll, who married her Spanish beau in Barcelona. “As the day nears, couples will be swamped with too many options and possibilities. But like in a business, they should be decisive once they’ve set their minds on something.”

    Bonifacio reminded couples, especially when they’re in doubt about their decisions, always to “go back to the why. Why are we doing this?”

    Sioson added: “At the end of the day, no matter what others would say, and they would always have an opinion, you do it for yourself. What’s really important is what happens to you as a couple after.”

    Read more:vintage bridesmaid dresses

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  • دوشنبه 4 آبان 1394

    top firing guns at weddings, Qatar’s MOI warns

    Gunfire at celebrations in Qatar is prohibited under the law and could turn “happiness into sorrow,” the Ministry of Interior has reminded residents this week.

    In a series of half a dozen tweets this week, the MOI warned against using firearms during special occasions, especially weddings, saying the practice is “extremely dangerous and could lead to human and material loss.”

    The MOI added:

    Translation: Any kind of firearm is a symbol of blood, while weddings call for happiness and joy; be sure not to carry (firearms), so our happiness does not turn into sorrow.

    The law

    Carrying and using firearms during celebrations in Qatar is illegal, according to Law No. 14 of 1999.

    Photo for illustrative purposes only.

    Translation: Some people continue to carry firearms and shoot gunshots on special occasions and weddings, which is a violation that puts them under legal liability.

    Article 12 states:

    Penalties for firing guns or setting off fireworks in residential areas or on public roads without a license can range from QR1,000 to QR3,000.

    Speaking to Doha News, former Qatar justice minister and practicing criminal attorney Dr. Najeeb Al Nuaimi said that firing guns in isolated areas far from neighborhoods is legal as long as the firearm is licensed.

    However, he added that it’s dangerous to use firearms in public areas where people have gathered.

    Cultural practice

    Firing guns in the air to express joy during celebrations, especially at weddings, is a common practice in many Arab countries.

    Al Nuaimi said that before the law in Qatar was issued, men always used to fire guns during weddings to greet the groom and guests, as was the culture in many other GCC countries.

    Tribes of the World/Flickr

    Wedding in the UAE for illustrative purposes only.However, many nations have outlawed the practice because it is so dangerous.

    In 2012 for example, gunfire at a wedding party in eastern Saudi Arabia led to the collapse of an electric cable, killing 23 people, according to NBC.

    Years earlier in 2007, three people were killed in Baghdad from celebratory gunfire when fans of the Iraqi football team celebrated their win against Vietnam during the Asian cup, according to the BBC.

    Studies cited by the channel state that although the velocity of a falling bullet is less than one that has just been shot, it is still enough to be fatal.

    Ballistics expert David Dyson explained:

    “These bullets go a long way up when they’re fired… but you don’t know where they’re going to land – there’s always a chance of them causing serious harm or death.”

    Theorizing on the reason for the gunfire practice, Prof. Peter Squires, an expert in gun crime and gun culture at the University of Brighton, told the BBC that “the practice stems from cultural assumptions linking weapons with masculinity and ego.”

    Regardless of safety concerns, Al Nuami said many continue in Qatar continue to flout the law and fire guns.

    Laws and penalties

    To own a firearm in Qatar, one must obtain a license from the MOI. According to regulations cited in article nine of the Law No. 14 of 1999, applicants must:

    Keary O/Flickr

    Photo for illustrative purposes only.Be more than 21 years old;

    Not have a criminal record, including committing or attempting to commit crimes related to attacking people, theft, or crimes that violate honor or integrity;

    Not been previously arrested in a crime against the state or related to the military forces;

    Not been previously arrested in crimes related to drugs or narcotics;

    Have a proven good character and conduct; and

    Not proven to have any mental or psychological illness or disability the prevents him from using a gun properly.

    It does not specify whether an applicant must be Qatari, but Nuami said licenses are rarely given to expats unless they work in the special forces or are in the military. He added that it’s also not easy for a local to obtain a license for a gun even if he or she meets the above specifications.

    Penalties for possessing unlicensed firearms in Qatar ranges from fines of QR1,000 to QR50,000 and/or a prison sentence ranging from one year to seven years in prison, depending on the kind of firearm.

    Thoughts?

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